Peter Pan Final Idea

My idea for my final piece will be to do a short scene from Peter Pan.

There will be 4 characters in it:

  • The Narrator
  • Peter Pan
  • Wendy
  • Tinkerbell

There will also be many sound effects within the background. Each bit of speech, the appropriate character will say, and obviously Tinkerbell’s ‘voice’ is the sound of a bell as she speaks in ‘fairy language’, which I think will sound quite effective in the script. I have put an example of the script I think I am going to use at the bottom of the page.

My example of how I will create the appropriate sounds:

Narrator 

Peter Pan

Wendy

Tinkerbell

Sound Effects

[“You see, Wendy, when the first baby laughed for the first time, (baby laugh) its laugh broke into a thousand pieces (shatter noise), and they all went skipping about, (light footsteps) and that was the beginning of fairies.” ]

[ Tedious talk this, but being a stay-at-home she liked it. ]

[“And so,”]

Light tip-toe footsteps as if Peter is walking around

[he went on good-naturedly,

[“there ought to be one fairy for every boy and girl.” ]

[“Ought to be? Isn’t there?”]

[ “No. You see children know such a lot now, they soon don’t believe in fairies, and every time a child says, `I don’t believe in fairies,’ there is a fairy somewhere that falls down dead.” ]

Dropping sound

Narrator [Really, he thought they had now talked enough about fairies, and it struck him that Tinker Bell was keeping very quiet.

Peter Pan [ “I can’t think where she has gone to,”

[he said, rising, and he called Tink by name. Wendy’s heart went flutter with a sudden thrill. ]

[“Peter,”]

[she cried, clutching him, ]

 [“you don’t mean to tell me that there is a fairy in this room!” ]

[ “She was here just now,” ]

 [he said a little impatiently. ]

 [“You don’t hear her, do you?”

[ and they both listened. ]

Tinkerbell (bell noises trapped in drawer – muted)

[ “The only sound I hear,”]

 [ said Wendy, ]

 [“is like a tinkle of bells.” ]

[ “Well, that’s Tink, that’s the fairy language. I think I hear her too.”]

[The sound come from the chest of drawers, and Peter made a merry face. No one could ever look quite so merry as Peter, and the loveliest of gurgles was his laugh. He had his first laugh still. ]

(Bell noises a bit closer)

[ “Wendy,”]

[he whispered gleefully,]

[“I do believe I shut her up in the drawer!” (close drawer sound)

Part of the scene of the script that I think I will use: 

“Now,” said he, “shall I give you a kiss?” and she replied with a slight primness, “If you please.” She made herself rather cheap by inclining her face toward him, but he merely dropped an acorn button into her hand, so she slowly returned her face to where it had been before, and said nicely that she would wear his kiss on the chain around her neck. It was lucky that she did put it on that chain, for it was afterwards to save her life.

When people in our set are introduced, it is customary for them to ask each other’s age, and so Wendy, who always liked to do the correct thing, asked Peter how old he was. It was not really a happy question to ask him; it was like an examination paper that asks grammar, when what you want to be asked is Kings of England.

“I don’t know,” he replied uneasily, “but I am quite young.” He really knew nothing about it, he had merely suspicions, but he said at a venture, “Wendy, I ran away the day I was born.”

Wendy was quite surprised, but interested; and she indicated in the charming drawing-room manner, by a touch on her night-gown, that he could sit nearer her. 1 MINUTE 

“It was because I heard father and mother,” he explained in a low voice, “talking about what I was to be when I became a man.” He was extraordinarily agitated now. “I don’t want ever to be a man,” he said with passion. “I want always to be a little boy and to have fun. So I ran away to Kensington Gardens and lived a long long time among the fairies.”

She gave him a look of the most intense admiration, and he thought it was because he had run away, but it was really because he knew fairies. Wendy had lived such a home life that to know fairies struck her as quite delightful. She poured out questions about them, to his surprise, for they were rather a nuisance to him, getting in his way and so on, and indeed he sometimes had to give them a hiding [spanking]. Still, he liked them on the whole, and he told her about the beginning of fairies.

“You see, Wendy, when the first baby laughed for the first time, its laugh broke into a thousand pieces, and they all went skipping about, and that was the beginning of fairies.”

Tedious talk this, but being a stay-at-home she liked it.

“And so,” he went on good-naturedly, “there ought to be one fairy for every boy and girl.”

“Ought to be? Isn’t there?” 2 MINUTES 

“No. You see children know such a lot now, they soon don’t believe in fairies, and every time a child says, `I don’t believe in fairies,’ there is a fairy somewhere that falls down dead.”

Really, he thought they had now talked enough about fairies, and it struck him that Tinker Bell was keeping very quiet. “I can’t think where she has gone to,” he said, rising, and he called Tink by name. Wendy’s heart went flutter with a sudden thrill.

“Peter,” she cried, clutching him, “you don’t mean to tell me that there is a fairy in this room!”

“She was here just now,” he said a little impatiently. “You don’t hear her, do you?” and they both listened.

“The only sound I hear,” said Wendy, “is like a tinkle of bells.”

“Well, that’s Tink, that’s the fairy language. I think I hear her too.”

The sound come from the chest of drawers, and Peter made a merry face. No one could ever look quite so merry as Peter, and the loveliest of gurgles was his laugh. He had his first laugh still.

“Wendy,” he whispered gleefully, “I do believe I shut her up in the drawer!” (banging/tapping bell noises)

He let poor Tink out of the drawer, and she flew about the nursery screaming with fury. (angry bell noises) “You shouldn’t say such things,” Peter retorted. “Of course I’m very sorry, but how could I know you were in the drawer?”

Wendy was not listening to him. “O Peter,” she cried, “if she would only stand still and let me see her!” 3 MINUTES

 Analysed – Peter Pan Script

 

Sounds I need:

Bell – Tinkerbell

Footsteps

Wind – flying noises

Clock chime

Dialogue

Dog barking

Yawn

Jumping on bed – excitement – practicing flying

Crying/screaming

Thudding ground – practicing flying

 

Research

 

James Newton Howard – Music

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Newton_Howard

James Newton Howard is an American composer, who has scored over 100 films. Some of his most-famous work includes, The Hunger Games, The Dark Knight, I Am Legend, King Kong, The Bourne Legacy, etc.

He also worked on the soundtrack for the 2003 film version of Peter Pan where the ‘flying’ was also used later in commercials for Disneyland Paris.

 

 

Jana Vance – Foley

http://www.literatureproject.com/peter-pan/peter-pan_4.htm

 

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